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Bruno Mars’s Top 10 Rules For Success (@BrunoMars)


– It’s not about the tabloids, it’s about you, putting in the
work, practicing every day. I just felt like I was waiting, and waiting, and waiting for everybody. Waiting for a producer to work with me, waiting for a songwriter to work with me. And as soon as I graduated high school, I wanted to take the next step. You know, my music
reflects my personality, and who I am, so if my music’s unorthodox, maybe I’m unorthodox. There’s cameras everywhere you go. There’s one looking at me right
now, it’s creeping me out. You know, these guys know
how to go up on stage with their band, and
control their environment. Rock the party. I want to make sure that
at the end of the day, we stand by our product. Everybody nowadays has an opinion. Everybody’s a critic. Why we want to do music is
because that’s what brings us joy. I was at the airport, and these huge Irish dudes start pacing around me. And I was like, alright,
it’s going to go down at the airport, here we go. – He’s an American singer, songwriter, producer, and choreographer. He’s received many awards and nominations, including four Grammy Awards. He’s sold over 100 million
singles and albums worldwide, making him one of the best selling recording artists of all time. He’s Bruno Mars and here are
his top 10 rules for success. – Any young aspiring musicians out there, if music is what you want to do, if music is what you
love, and your passion. It doesn’t take a fragrance,
it’s not about the tabloids. It’s about you, putting in the
work, practicing every day, practicing your vocals,
practicing your instrument, practicing songwriting. And hopefully one day you
write the song, you know, the whole world wants to get down to. And I promise you, I
promise you, one day you’re going to have your moment to shine, and you’re going to have
a lot of people saying that you can’t do it, and
you’re not good enough. But I promise you, if you
go out there and you sing, and you put your heart and soul into it, and you follow your dream,
one day you’re going to be sitting next to Ellen Degeneres. – (laughs) (crowd cheers and claps) – You’re going to be sitting
next to Ellen Degeneres, talking about how you broke records and rocked the Superbowl. Hit it! Stand up! Stand up America! (“Going to Fly Now”) (crowd cheering and
clapping drowns out words) Yes, yes! (crowd screaming and cheering) I did it, Ellen, I did it! I did it! I did it! Let’s go! (crowd cheering) I wanted to write a song because, I didn’t want no one else
to write a song for me. And I didn’t want to wait for anybody else to write a song for me. I think that’s more of the
reason I was so frustrated. ‘Cause I got signed at a young age, and I just felt like I
was waiting, and waiting, and waiting for everybody. Waiting for a producer to work with me, waiting for a songwriter to work with me. You know, I play a little bit of guitar, I play a little bit of piano, so why wouldn’t I just
want to do it myself? – After you moved to LA from Hawaii, you got there, and what was the reason to leave Hawaii in the first place? – I think I needed to take
a shot at the big time. I wanted to make my album,
start writing my own music. I’ve been performing my whole
life in Hawaii, in Waikiki, in parties, and weddings, and shows. Anything you could think of. Restaurants, bars, and clubs. And I felt like I did a lot in Hawaii. As soon as I graduated high
school, I wanted to take the next step and hopefully
do it even bigger. – So you got there to LA and parked with just your suitcase, probably– – It wasn’t even my suitcase. – (laughs) Any money? – Absolutely not. I probably had about $600
I saved up, 700 maybe. – Now what was the plan then, I mean, how did you feel at this special moment getting there and having no clue as to what’s going to happen next? – It was exciting. I was young, my sister helped me out. She let me stay with her for a year, and I got signed to Motown Records. That didn’t really work
out, but I had to learn. It’s such a learning process,
and a lot of rejection. I think people have to understand that that’s just a part of the you know, what it takes to kind of finally come up with your own album, is that you need to be
rejected over and over and everyone telling you
you’re not good enough. To kind of break through that,
and that’s what it takes. You know before I got
signed, I used to go and play my songs for record
labels, and big executive presidents of labels. And that was always what they told me, that my music is too unorthodox,
too all over the place, and they don’t know how to market that. And to me that was always
a hard pill to swallow, because my music reflects
my personality and who I am, so if my music’s unorthodox,
maybe I’m unorthodox. Why should I change who I
am for business reasons. So it was more of a
statement of my freedom. I’ve always wanted to
be an artist, you know? And you think in your
mind, it’s like, alright, I’m going to make an album,
then I’m going to do shows. I’m going to sleep all day,
wake up, do another show. Wake up in another city. I’m finding out that it’s not like that. I’m finding out that you got
to put in some hard work, you know, for people to know who you are. There’s cameras everywhere you go. There’s one looking at me right
now, it’s creeping me out. – [Interviewer] Oh yeah, always. It’s my life, we’ve always had cameras.
– That’s your life. It’s all getting used to, but I’m living the dream
right now, the American dream. The reason why I like
Elvis is the same reason I like James Brown,
Michael Jackson, Prince. You know, these guys know
how to go up on stage with their band and
control their environment. Rock the party. No tricks, no smoke, no mirrors, just raw talent and great songs. – [Man] If you have to pick one, that you admire the
most, which would it be? – Who I admire the most? – [Man] James Brown, or– – I think as far as music’s concerned, no one has done it in such a
big way than Michael Jackson. – [Man] You mean his own music, writing– – Just everything, all
around, the whole thing. When it comes down to music videos. The way he dressed, how innovative he was. I think you can go to
any country in the world, and five year old kids will
know who Michael Jackson is, because he’s such a big part of music. His music just brought the
world together, basically. – [Man] And after that, Elvis? – Man, I’ve never came
up with a list before. I like these guys for
all different reasons, so it’s hard for me to put them– – [Man] Just pick a few parts, and Elvis, what do you admire in him? – Like I said, the reason why I like Elvis so much is because if you know the story,
he’s taking chances. He grew up listening to music that people weren’t allowed to listen to. And I just like the fact
that he didn’t care, and he did it. – [Man] Prince? – Prince. Being extremely innovative, and again, someone that is such an individual. And a freak of talent,
you know, the guy plays so many instruments, and
plays instruments, you know, he could hang with the
best on any instrument. On the drums, on guitar, on piano, and an incredible, incredible songwriter. – Do you have a hero? – Do I have a hero? – [Woman] Yeah. – Of course. – Who? – Superman. All we’re trying to do,
every time we write a song, is to just feel an emotion
that we’ve never felt before, or, you know, be shocked
that wow, we did this. And if we don’t feel that
way, then I don’t think it’s worthy enough to be on the album that we’re trying to promote. And we want to make sure
that at the end of the day, we stand by our product. Harshest criticism. Look, the thing is, you
know, in the beginning, it’s a little funky,
but you got to realize that everybody nowadays has an opinion. Everybody’s a critic. And you know, you could
watch my video on YouTube and leave a comment, you can
go to iTunes and buy my album and leave a comment. You could tweet whatever
you want, you know. You’re going to drive yourself crazy if you really take those things seriously. Not everyone’s going to love ya. It got a little rocky two years ago. You know, that’s when
we were at the bottom. And luckily I found Philip Lawrence, who’s a tremendous person,
and a great songwriter. And me and him just clicked, and I found a friend that understands. We don’t take it too seriously. You know, we’re happy doing music. That’s why we want to do music, is because that’s what brings us joy. We were in the studio,
just writing and writing, hoping that this is going to pay
off, this is going to pay off. I was at the airport, and
these huge Irish dudes start pacing around me. And I was like, alright, it’s
going to go down at the airport, here we go. And they go, “Ay!” I think they’re Australian,
so let me change to Australian accent. He said, “Ay! Are you Bruno Mars?” And I was like, yes. (crowd laughs) They said, “Could you sign our forearms?” (crowd laughs) So they busted out a
Sharpie and I’m signing these like rugby players’ forearms, and they’re like, “Yo,
that Billionaire song, “you’re a legend, you’re a legend.” – Oh that’s so great, oh my God. Have you signed any other body parts? – (laughs) No, thank God. – Looking forward to that. – Yeah, you know when
you’re a kid, you’re like, oh, one day I’m going to
be signing all these girls, and then nope, not me. Big brutes. – Aussie rugby players. – Aussie rugby players. I try to be an artist. I moved up to California to be an artist. So I’m writing these songs,
and they’re all from me. Never wanted to be a producer,
never thought about writing with other people, for other people. So I’m writing this song for me, and I got approached by a label that heard one of these songs, and they said, look, we want
this song for another artist. We don’t want to sign you,
we want to take your song and give it to another artist. At the time I was working
with Kara for the first time. And you know as a songwriter
she’s written so many hits. And talked to her and I said, Kara, look, I don’t know what to do. I really want to be an artist. They want my music, this is
my music, this is my art. She looks at me and she
says, “Stop being a bitch.” (crowd laughs) She says, “No one knows
who the hell you are. “You have no story. “Sell your frickin’ song,
what is it the last song “you’re ever going to write, you bitch?” (crowd laughs) I was like, Jesus, Kara. – And so you did. – And I did, and that paid my rent. And that got me to stay up
here, and got me, you know. So I owe a lot to Kara Dioguardi. – And the writing credits that
you are amounting since then, she’s dead right. – Yeah, thank you Kara for calling me a bitch. – Thank you so much for watching. I made this video because
noname11 asked me to. So if there’s a famous
entrepreneur that you want me to profile next, leave
it in the comments below and I’ll see what I can do. I’d also love to know which
of Bruno Mars’ top 10 rules had the biggest impact on
you, what changes you’re going to make as a result
of watching this video. Really curious to find out. Leave it in the comments,
and I’ll join the discussion. Thank you so much for watching. Continue to believe,
and I’ll see you soon.

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